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An Example of a Letter to Mail, Fax, or E-mail Your Representative Regarding the Death Tax Elimination Act of 2001 (H.R. 8)

Mailed or Faxed Correpondence...

To A Representative:

The Honorable (full name)
United States House of Representatives
Washington, DC 20515

Dear Representative (last name):

The Death Tax Elimination Act of 2001 (H.R. 8), scheduled to reach the entire House of Representatives the first week of April, would erase the estate tax by 2011 with a savings to Americans of almost $193 billion.

Under today's estate tax laws, the Internal Revenue Service can take up to 60 percent of a taxpayer's possessions and investments after he dies. This tremendous loss to families of individuals who had spent a lifetime working and investing to provide a good economic foundation for their offspring should not be allowed to continue.

Not even the government benefits from the "death tax." It is costly to collect, its yield is negligible, and its only apparent purpose is to redistribute income. Most often, the death tax burdens the very people it is intended to help such as women and minorities, farmers, small businessmen, and low-income families.

Former President Clinton refused to sign the repealing of the estate tax law when it came up for a vote in 2000. President Bush has already announced his support for such legislation. If the Death Tax Elimination Act of 2001 (H.R. 8) is passed, Americans will finally be able to offer their families an inheritance that can improve their own way of life and, in many cases, help the country's economy. Taxpayers have been burdened by the estate tax for over eighty years. It's time to set them free.

As your constituent, I encourage you to support the Death Tax Elimination Act of 2001 (H.R. 8).

Thank you for your consideration to support this bill.

Sincerely,

(Your Name*)

*Be sure to include your complete address in the letter.

E-mail Correspondence...

The following format should be used in the body of your message:

Your Name
Address
City, State  Zip Code

Dear (Title) (last name),

The Death Tax Elimination Act of 2001 (H.R. 8), scheduled to reach the entire House of Representatives the first week of April, would erase the estate tax by 2011 with a savings to Americans of almost $193 billion.

Under today's estate tax laws, the Internal Revenue Service can take up to 60 percent of a taxpayer's possessions and investments after he dies. This tremendous loss to families of individuals who had spent a lifetime working and investing to provide a good economic foundation for their offspring should not be allowed to continue.

Not even the government benefits from the "death tax." It is costly to collect, its yield is negligible, and its only apparent purpose is to redistribute income. Most often, the death tax burdens the very people it is intended to help such as women and minorities, farmers, small businessmen, and low-income families.

Former President Clinton refused to sign the repealing of the estate tax law when it came up for a vote in 2000. President Bush has already announced his support for such legislation. If the Death Tax Elimination Act of 2001 (H.R. 8) is passed, Americans will finally be able to offer their families an inheritance that can improve their own way of life and, in many cases, help the country's economy. Taxpayers have been burdened by the estate tax for over eighty years. It's time to set them free.

As your constituent, I encourage you to support the Death Tax Elimination Act of 2001 (H.R. 8).

Thank you for your consideration to support this bill.

Sincerely,

(Your Name)

REMINDER: It is proper to address the Chair of a Committee or the Speaker of the House when writing them as...

Dear Mr. Speaker:

or

Dear Mr. Chairman or Madam Chairwoman:

For more information about Tax Relief Legislation, click here.

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