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Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2001 (S. 27)

Mailed or Faxed Correpondence...

To A Senator:

The Honorable (full name)
United States Senate
Washington, DC 20510

Dear Senator (last name):

The Bipartisan Campaign Finance Reform Act of 2001 (McCain-Feingold Legislation) would outlaw large, unregulated "soft money" donations from corporations, unions and individuals..

According to Senator John McCain and other proponents of campaign finance reform, excessive spending on campaigns by candidates has caused public cynicism about and mistrust of the United States government. In fact, the reformers claim that Congress should move immediately to pass new campaign finance laws because of the public's outcry over this issue. However, according to statistics on public opinion, the cynicism about politics was the result of events occurring in American history that the government was responsible for, not the issue of campaign contributions to candidates. During a period that included the Vietnam War, Watergate, and the economic mistakes of the Carter Administration (1964-1980), public trust declined steadily.

If it becomes law, the McCain-Feingold bill poses fundamental free-speech questions and faces inevitable court challenges. The Supreme Court will probably have to resolve the restrictions imposed by the measure.

If Senator McCain and his supporters were serious about campaign finance reform, they would consider repealing the limits on individual and political action committees (PACs) contributions to candidates and parties as well as party contributions to candidates, thus leveling the playing field between incumbents and challengers. The overtly complex regulatory process would be simplified, and intrusive FEC investigations that last for years would be lessened. The transparency and political FEC accountability of the electoral process would be improved, and most importantly, would not infringe on the freedom of speech afforded to by the First Amendment.

As you constituent, I would like you to represent me in your voice against the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2001.

Sincerely,

(Your Name*)

*Be sure to include your complete address in the letter.

E-mail Correspondence...

The following format should be used in the body of your message:

Your Name
Address
City, State  Zip Code

Dear Senator (last name),

The Bipartisan Campaign Finance Reform Act of 2001 (McCain-Feingold Legislation) would outlaw large, unregulated "soft money" donations from corporations, unions and individuals..

According to Senator John McCain and other proponents of campaign finance reform, excessive spending on campaigns by candidates has caused public cynicism about and mistrust of the United States government. In fact, the reformers claim that Congress should move immediately to pass new campaign finance laws because of the public's outcry over this issue. However, according to statistics on public opinion, the cynicism about politics was the result of events occurring in American history that the government was responsible for, not the issue of campaign contributions to candidates. During a period that included the Vietnam War, Watergate, and the economic mistakes of the Carter Administration (1964-1980), public trust declined steadily.

If it becomes law, the McCain-Feingold bill poses fundamental free-speech questions and faces inevitable court challenges. The Supreme Court will probably have to resolve the restrictions imposed by the measure.

If Senator McCain and his supporters were serious about campaign finance reform, they would consider repealing the limits on individual and political action committees (PACs) contributions to candidates and parties as well as party contributions to candidates, thus leveling the playing field between incumbents and challengers. The overtly complex regulatory process would be simplified, and intrusive FEC investigations that last for years would be lessened. The transparency and political FEC accountability of the electoral process would be improved, and most importantly, would not infringe on the freedom of speech afforded to by the First Amendment.

As you constituent, I would like you to represent me in your voice against the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2001.

Sincerely,

(Your Name)

*Be sure to include your complete address in the letter.

For more information about Campaign Finance Reform, click here.

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